Justice for Iran

In solidarity with the beautiful and courageous people of Iran.

You can find me at Kateoplis.
CIA Admits It Was Behind Iran’s Coup
The agency finally owns up to its role in the 1953 operation.
“Sixty years ago this Monday, on August 19, 1953, modern Iranian history took a critical turn when a U.S.- and British-backed coup overthrew the country’s prime minister, Mohammed Mossadegh. The event’s reverberations have haunted its orchestrators over the years, contributing to the anti-Americanism that accompanied the Shah’s ouster in early 1979, and even influencing the Iranians who seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran later that year.
But it has taken almost six decades for the U.S. intelligence community to acknowledge openly that it was behind the controversial overthrow. Published here today — and on the website of the National Security Archive, which obtained the document through the Freedom of Information Act — is a brief excerpt from The Battle for Iran, an internal report prepared in the mid-1970s by an in-house CIA historian.
The document was first released in 1981, but with most of it excised, including all of Section III, entitled “Covert Action” — the part that describes the coup itself. Most of that section remains under wraps, but this new version does formally make public, for the first time that we know of, the fact of the agency’s participation: “[T]he military coup that overthrew Mosadeq and his National Front cabinet was carried out under CIA direction as an act of U.S. foreign policy,” the history reads. The risk of leaving Iran “open to Soviet aggression,” it adds, “compelled the United States … in planning and executing TPAJAX.”
TPAJAX was the CIA’s codename for the overthrow plot, which relied on local collaborators at every stage. It consisted of several steps: using propaganda to undermine Mossadegh politically, inducing the Shah to cooperate, bribing members of parliament, organizing the security forces, and ginning up public demonstrations. The initial attempt actually failed, but after a mad scramble the coup forces pulled themselves together and came through on their second try, on August 19.”
Read on.

CIA Admits It Was Behind Iran’s Coup

The agency finally owns up to its role in the 1953 operation.

Sixty years ago this Monday, on August 19, 1953, modern Iranian history took a critical turn when a U.S.- and British-backed coup overthrew the country’s prime minister, Mohammed Mossadegh. The event’s reverberations have haunted its orchestrators over the years, contributing to the anti-Americanism that accompanied the Shah’s ouster in early 1979, and even influencing the Iranians who seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran later that year.

But it has taken almost six decades for the U.S. intelligence community to acknowledge openly that it was behind the controversial overthrow. Published here today — and on the website of the National Security Archive, which obtained the document through the Freedom of Information Act — is a brief excerpt from The Battle for Iran, an internal report prepared in the mid-1970s by an in-house CIA historian.

The document was first released in 1981, but with most of it excised, including all of Section III, entitled “Covert Action” — the part that describes the coup itself. Most of that section remains under wraps, but this new version does formally make public, for the first time that we know of, the fact of the agency’s participation: “[T]he military coup that overthrew Mosadeq and his National Front cabinet was carried out under CIA direction as an act of U.S. foreign policy,” the history reads. The risk of leaving Iran “open to Soviet aggression,” it adds, “compelled the United States … in planning and executing TPAJAX.”

TPAJAX was the CIA’s codename for the overthrow plot, which relied on local collaborators at every stage. It consisted of several steps: using propaganda to undermine Mossadegh politically, inducing the Shah to cooperate, bribing members of parliament, organizing the security forces, and ginning up public demonstrations. The initial attempt actually failed, but after a mad scramble the coup forces pulled themselves together and came through on their second try, on August 19.”

Read on.

The Bob Dylan Of Iran

NPR: “Singer Mohsen Namjoo was sentenced to five years in prison in absentia under President Ahmadinejad for songs disparaging the Koran. Guest host Linda Wertheimer speaks with Namjoo on the day before Hassan Rouhani is sworn in as president.”

A lovely contemporary Persian dance performed by French resident Moshkin Ghalam, and as my mother confirms, it’s to an old Bakhtiari song based on a Persian warrior called Shir(lion) Ali Mardoun. Happy weekend.

lacma:

The Tehran-based photographer, Newsha Tavakolian’s, conceptual series “Listen” and “The Day I Became a Woman” are now on exhibit at LACMA, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The “Listen” series focus on Iranian professional female singers who have been unable to perform solo or to produce their own music since the revolution in 1979. 
(via Artlog)

lacma:

The Tehran-based photographer, Newsha Tavakolian’s, conceptual series “Listen” and “The Day I Became a Woman” are now on exhibit at LACMA, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The “Listen” series focus on Iranian professional female singers who have been unable to perform solo or to produce their own music since the revolution in 1979. 

(via Artlog)

Persian mythology holds that if a Nurk appears on the windowsill in the morning, a relative will either come into money or break both legs at a raffle.

haaretz:

From Persia to Jerusalem: To mark the start of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, Israel’s National Library has curated a special digital display of 30 rare Koran manuscripts that date from the 9th through the 19th centuries and originate from diverse locales throughout the Muslim world.

They always show the guys shouting “Death to America!!” Just once I wish the media would show us, I don’t know, baking a cookie. I’ve been to Iran, we have cookies, I swear. Just once, I want the media to be like, “Okay, we’re going to go to Mohammed in Iran” and then a guy would appear like “Hello, I’m Mohammed… and I’m just baking a cookie.”

—Maz Jobrani

(Source: yourfriendlycomrade, via beardtoken)