Justice for Iran

In solidarity with the beautiful and courageous people of Iran.

You can find me at Kateoplis.
"Confusion is rife in the Iranian capital about a recent showing of musical instruments on Iranian state television that broke a three-decade taboo. 
Last weekend, Iran’s Channel One aired a live concert by a group of musicians playing traditional instruments on a show called “Good Morning Iran.”
Some Shia Muslim clerics say that broadcasting music clashes with religious tenets. So in Iran, a country with a long history of both religious and secular music, the state broadcaster has come up with a somewhat convoluted solution.
When it airs performances of traditional Iranian music for a domestic audience, singers are allowed in front of the cameras, but musical instruments are absent from the screen. When musicians play, Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB) shows shots of the studio or pastoral scenes, such as waterfalls, birds and mountains.”
Iran state TV breaks decades-long taboo against showing instruments
[Via ericmortensen]

"Confusion is rife in the Iranian capital about a recent showing of musical instruments on Iranian state television that broke a three-decade taboo. 

Last weekend, Iran’s Channel One aired a live concert by a group of musicians playing traditional instruments on a show called “Good Morning Iran.”

Some Shia Muslim clerics say that broadcasting music clashes with religious tenets. So in Iran, a country with a long history of both religious and secular music, the state broadcaster has come up with a somewhat convoluted solution.

When it airs performances of traditional Iranian music for a domestic audience, singers are allowed in front of the cameras, but musical instruments are absent from the screen. When musicians play, Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB) shows shots of the studio or pastoral scenes, such as waterfalls, birds and mountains.”

Iran state TV breaks decades-long taboo against showing instruments

[Via ericmortensen]

pbsthisdayinhistory:

December 3, 1979: Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini Becomes Leader of Iran
On this day in 1979, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini was made Supreme Leader of Iran during the midst of a hostage crisis with the United States. A month earlier, over 60 Americans were held hostage by a group of Iranian students after storming the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. The remaining 52 hostages were released in January 1981 after 444 days of captivity.
Read FRONTLINE’s “The Hostage Crisis, 30 Years On” article for a timeline of events and more details.
Photo: Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini (PBS.org)

The official birthdate of our darkest period.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

December 3, 1979: Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini Becomes Leader of Iran

On this day in 1979, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini was made Supreme Leader of Iran during the midst of a hostage crisis with the United States. A month earlier, over 60 Americans were held hostage by a group of Iranian students after storming the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. The remaining 52 hostages were released in January 1981 after 444 days of captivity.

Read FRONTLINE’s “The Hostage Crisis, 30 Years On” article for a timeline of events and more details.

Photo: Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini (PBS.org)

The official birthdate of our darkest period.

kateoplis:

"What’s terrible is to pretend that second-rate is first-rate. To pretend that you don’t need love when you do; or you like your work when you know quite well you’re capable of better.” 
Doris Lessing, born in Iran (then known as Persia) and brought up in the African bush in Zimbabwe, a Marxist-turned-Sufi novelist, playwright, poet, author of ”feminist bible” - The Golden Notebook, librettist, sci-fi writer, and the eleventh woman to ever receive the Nobel Prize in Lit, dead at 94.

kateoplis:

"What’s terrible is to pretend that second-rate is first-rate. To pretend that you don’t need love when you do; or you like your work when you know quite well you’re capable of better.” 

Doris Lessing, born in Iran (then known as Persia) and brought up in the African bush in Zimbabwe, a Marxist-turned-Sufi novelist, playwright, poet, author of ”feminist bible” - The Golden Notebook, librettistsci-fi writer, and the eleventh woman to ever receive the Nobel Prize in Lit, dead at 94.

theparisreview:

“Over the past twenty years, as he has traveled throughout Iran, Mohsen Rastani has been taking family portraits. From sparsely populated villages to small, crowded cities, wherever he goes, he takes a white backdrop with him. Sometimes when he stays in one place for a while, he opens a temporary studio to shoot his portraits. And sometimes he makes the street into his studio. When he sees people he wants to photograph, he tells them he doesn’t wish to bother them but asks them to call him. In this way, his subjects come to him, and when they stand between his camera and the backdrop he allows them to present themselves however they like.

“To Rastani, the white backdrop is almost as important to these photographs as the people that appear against it. The backdrop, he says, ‘isolates people better in our minds, so they become eternal … like myths, carved images on the stone walls of Persepolis.’”

Mohsen Rastani, “Iranian Family Portraits”

Iran set to relax book censorship

"Those books subjected to censorship or denied permission to be published in the past will be reviewed again and new decisions will be made. Our approach towards freedom of the press and books, as well as relaxing the atmosphere for writers and thinkers, is different from the past and its results will gradually become apparent."

Culture minister Ali Jannati | Guardian

Maybe you are searching among the branches for what only appears in the roots.

—Rumi

(Source: shaktilover, via beardtoken)