Justice for Iran

Apr 11

[video]

Apr 02

Azadeh Falakshahi, Vatan [via saatchiart]
Vatan = my country
Azadeh = free

Azadeh Falakshahi, Vatan [via saatchiart]

Vatan = my country

Azadeh = free

(via elvira)

Mar 26

[video]

Mar 14

[video]

Mar 12

thetehrantimes:

Do you know when is my favorite time of the year? When the Norouz perfume is everywhere…

Norouz… I can almost smell it.

thetehrantimes:

Do you know when is my favorite time of the year?
When the Norouz perfume is everywhere…

Norouz… I can almost smell it.

thetehrantimes:

The Tehran Times on the cover page of The Guardian.

Love.

thetehrantimes:

The Tehran Times on the cover page of The Guardian.

Love.

Feb 21

humansofnewyork:

"We’re gay refugees from Iran."

humansofnewyork:

"We’re gay refugees from Iran."

Feb 19

[video]

Jan 31

[video]

Jan 27

"Confusion is rife in the Iranian capital about a recent showing of musical instruments on Iranian state television that broke a three-decade taboo. 
Last weekend, Iran’s Channel One aired a live concert by a group of musicians playing traditional instruments on a show called “Good Morning Iran.”
Some Shia Muslim clerics say that broadcasting music clashes with religious tenets. So in Iran, a country with a long history of both religious and secular music, the state broadcaster has come up with a somewhat convoluted solution.
When it airs performances of traditional Iranian music for a domestic audience, singers are allowed in front of the cameras, but musical instruments are absent from the screen. When musicians play, Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB) shows shots of the studio or pastoral scenes, such as waterfalls, birds and mountains.”
Iran state TV breaks decades-long taboo against showing instruments
[Via ericmortensen]

"Confusion is rife in the Iranian capital about a recent showing of musical instruments on Iranian state television that broke a three-decade taboo. 

Last weekend, Iran’s Channel One aired a live concert by a group of musicians playing traditional instruments on a show called “Good Morning Iran.”

Some Shia Muslim clerics say that broadcasting music clashes with religious tenets. So in Iran, a country with a long history of both religious and secular music, the state broadcaster has come up with a somewhat convoluted solution.

When it airs performances of traditional Iranian music for a domestic audience, singers are allowed in front of the cameras, but musical instruments are absent from the screen. When musicians play, Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB) shows shots of the studio or pastoral scenes, such as waterfalls, birds and mountains.”

Iran state TV breaks decades-long taboo against showing instruments

[Via ericmortensen]